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emte

Are You Fuzzy Yet?

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Looking for a little bit of lecture, little bit of example, and a lot of "you can't do that fool!"

about fuzzy logic implementations in PICs (specifically integer based ones).

 

PID stuff is not wanted in this thread, just embedded fuzzy logic implementations.

Prefereably without Fuzz-C being used to generate the code(This would be good in

a parallel thread as would be NOVOS implementations)

 

i am just venturing into this area and would appreciate any insight or examples

of successful implementations.

Edited by emte

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Looking for a little bit of lecture, little bit of example, and a lot of "you can't do that fool!"

about fuzzy logic implementations in PICs (specifically integer based ones).

 

PID stuff is not wanted in this thread, just embedded fuzzy logic implementations.

Prefereably without Fuzz-C being used to generate the code(This would be good in

a parallel thread as would be NOVOS implementations)

 

i am just venturing into this area and would appreciate any insight or examples

of successful implementations.

 

Microchip tinkered with fuzzy logic in the mid 90's hailing it as the next great thing, also at the same time they reckoned there was no requirement for expanding FLASH processors beyond PIC16F84 and that the soon to be released Golden Gate (PIC18) would solve all the shortcomings of PIC16. I guess the words "solve" and "inherit" were confused in the Microchip dictionary.

 

Try searching for fuzzy on Microchips website, the latest documents are dated around 1997.

 

 

Whilst down nostalgia town lets remember Microchips pi55 poor C compiler and the time the Microchip Data CD had a virus on it.(1996 I think), and instead of destroying all the CDs they put a sticker on them warning not to open a certain "Word" document.

 

</rant>

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That is funny, but yeah Microchip has quite a few ... issues.

 

As for doccuments on Microchips site, especially for programming,

i learned long ago that they are not a good idea to follow. The flowcharts,

application description, and logic examples are all good, but the code is

terrible.

 

There are also many tools out there to help you do this(Fuzz-C being

one of them), but i would like a basis first. "You can not know what you are

doing wrong if you do not know how to do it right in the first place!"

 

If no one is doing this using boostC/C++ or any of the compilers on this

forum, i will try to provide what a summary from what i am reading.

(Learning about Linguistic variables currently)

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i am thinking a simple hardware setup using two steppers and a solar panel

might be a good companion for my notes on fuzzy logic.

 

Would be a simple 2-axis solar tracking exercise, cheap and a decent way

to test basics in fuzzy logic implementation. Less than $10 for hardware

anyway, unless someone else has a good idea.

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Alright, just for an update.

 

The code that will follow will be for a temperature + pressure sensor setup

due to stuff i had on hand.

 

The temperature sensor is a Microchip TC1074.

The Pressure sensor is a Freescale MPXM2010GS

 

i think i decided i will toss the code in a webSVN repo and post the links to

relevant sections, just for readability.

Edited by emte

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Initial setup of repo can be accessed via the web at:

WebSVN Interface

Note: there is no other access to the repo untill someone requests

requests it for some reason.

 

All the interesting stuff is probably in main.c and library/FuzzyLogic.h.

 

***** added april 29

i just noticed i am commiting to the repo not connected to the web interface

will correct it soon.

Edited by emte

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AHA!

 

Lost some of the code trying to remember how to enable

multiple repositories, but it is back up.

 

As well it should be world pullable from:

svn://dev.labotomy.net/FuzzySVN

if you are so inclined.

(you can not write to it unless you request and i add you )

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Sorry about the inactivity lately, i have an RF project that has hit a few ...

issues between porting working code from the 18f452 to the 18F4620.

 

Hopefully i have finally caught them all and can do a bit on the fun

fuzzy stuff now.

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So much for getting caught up ...

i now have one job, and a production contract that are chewing up my time,

i do have new notes but not clear enough to post here yet, hopefully soon.

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So much for getting caught up ...

i now have one job, and a production contract that are chewing up my time,

i do have new notes but not clear enough to post here yet, hopefully soon.

 

 

emte

 

Not truly on topic, not being about PICs, but you might be interested anyway. I've been around a long time in electronics, seen quite a few things come - and quickly go! The one-bit processor? The General Instruments PIC? - it's still here :)

 

A favourite columnist over the years has been Bob Pease of National Semi. You might enjoy his take on fuzzy logic from back in the '90s, when it was the 'next big thing'.

 

http://www.national.com/rap/Application/0,1570,25,00.html

 

 

His stuff on audio accessories like speaker cables is fun too.

 

Regards, John

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I shall read as soon as if find time, which seems to be in very short supply for me.

Not only do I work 70 hours a week, i am also researching how to fabricate a waveguide laser.

 

 

So much for getting caught up ...

i now have one job, and a production contract that are chewing up my time,

i do have new notes but not clear enough to post here yet, hopefully soon.

 

 

emte

 

Not truly on topic, not being about PICs, but you might be interested anyway. I've been around a long time in electronics, seen quite a few things come - and quickly go! The one-bit processor? The General Instruments PIC? - it's still here :)

 

A favourite columnist over the years has been Bob Pease of National Semi. You might enjoy his take on fuzzy logic from back in the '90s, when it was the 'next big thing'.

 

http://www.national.com/rap/Application/0,1570,25,00.html

 

 

His stuff on audio accessories like speaker cables is fun too.

 

Regards, John

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I shall read as soon as if find time, which seems to be in very short supply for me.

Not only do I work 70 hours a week, i am also researching how to fabricate a waveguide laser.

I think you are so tried for working 70 hours a week. and i'm a student,where is my future?I don't want to work too long a day! :(:rolleyes:

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